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God after God: The God of the Past and the God of the Future as Seen in the Work of K

Author: 
Robert W. Jenson (Author)
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Description

Karl Barth is recognized throughout the world as the twentieth century's leading Protestant theologian. His thought has determined much of the shape of today's Christian thinking, yet it is thoroughly misunderstood. He is a systematic theologian who writes with great complexity and in a scholastic vein.

This fine and lucid study isolates Barth's most specific themes and focuses on the relevance of his radically trinitarian doctrine of God to the post–religious situation. The book opens with a discussion of the death of historical religion and Barth's early attempts to deal with the decline of belief in a transcendent God contrasted with contemporary views of the situation. It goes on to treat Barth's further studies, especially his attack on the theology of religion, and there is a discussion in depth of Barth's doctrine of the Trinity as a definition of God. It concludes with an analysis of the different interpretations that can be have been made of Barth's theology.
ISBN: 
9780800697884
Price: 
$26.00
Pages: 
232
Width: 
6
Height: 
9

Endorsements

"This scholarly work . . .is a thoroughgoing approach to Barth's leading contribution to twentieth–century dialectical theology. Barth's insights are shown to be far beyond their time. Especially relevant is his application of God's transcendence to man's practical responsibilities. Readers may well ponder whether Barth's Commentary on Romans may not clearly merit more than its present place on well–respected shelves of past history."
Library Journal