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Ethics

8-14 of 197
Release date: 
December 1, 2017

You want to make the world better. This book can help.

Faith in Action offers quick dives into a range of topics, from racial justice ...

Release date: 
November 1, 2017

Bringing the wisdom of generations of black Catholics into conversation with contemporary scholarly accounts of racism, Christ Divided diagnoses “antiblackness supremacy” as a corporate vice ...

Denis Edwards (Author)
Release date: 
November 1, 2017

Throughout the two-thousand-year span of Christian history, believers in Jesus have sought to articulate their faith and their understanding of how God works in the ...

Walter Wink (Author)
Release date: 
October 15, 2017

In this brilliant culmination of his seminal Powers Trilogy, now reissued in a twenty-fifth anniversary edition, Walter Wink explores the problem of evil today and ...

Release date: 
October 15, 2017

If the 1960s were a watershed in American politics, they were no less formative a period in political theology, as figures like Jacques Ellul, Karl ...

Release date: 
October 15, 2017

How does one read the signs of the times? What does it mean to resist? How do we engage faithfully in struggle? Dietrich Bonhoeffer has achieved iconic status as one who epitomizes what it means to struggle and resist tyranny and fascism and how one acts in faithful witness as a religious and political commitment. Bonhoeffer’s witness and example is more relevant than ever. A testimony to that is a crucial essay penned by Bonhoeffer in 1942; “After Ten Years” is a succinct and sober reflection, and remains one of the best descriptions ever written about what happened to the German people under National Socialism. This volume presents this timely and unique essay in a fresh translation and a penetrating introduction and analysis of the importance of this essay—in Bonhoeffer’s time and now in our own.

Susanne Scholz (Author)
Release date: 
October 15, 2017

Biblical studies and the teaching of biblical studies are clearly changing, though it is less clear what the changes mean and how we should evaluate them. Susanne Scholz casts a feminist eye on the politics of pedagogy, higher education, and wider society, decrypting important developments in “the architecture of educational power.” She also examines how the increasingly intercultural, interreligious, and diasporic dynamics in society inform the hermeneutical and methodological possibilities for biblical exegesis. Taken as a whole, the fourteen chapters demonstrate that the foregrounding of gender, placed into its intersectional contexts, offers intriguing and valuable alternative ways of seeing the world and the Bible’s place in it.

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