Fortress Press

From Paul to Valentinus: Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries

From Paul to Valentinus

Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries

Peter Lampe (Author), Michael Steinhauser (Translator)

$42.00

Interested in a gratis copy?

How do you plan on using your gratis copy?

Review
  • This item is not returnable
  • This product ships separately within 4-5 weeks of placing your order
In this pathbreaking study of the rise and shape of the earliest churches in Rome, Lampe integrates history, archaeology, theology, and social analysis. He also takes a close look at inscriptional evidence to complement the reading of the great literary texts: from Paul's Letter to the Romans to the writings of Clement of Rome, Justin Martyr, Montanus, and Valentinus. Thoroughly reworked and updated by the author for this English-language edition, this study is a groundbreaking work, broad in scope and closely detailed. Lampe deals with the shape of leadership and the Christians' relation to the Judeans living in Rome. In six parts, comprised of fifty-one chapters and four appendices, Lampe greatly advances our knowledge of the shape of leadership and the Christians' relation to the Judeans living in Rome.
  • Publisher Fortress Press
  • ISBN 9780800627027
  • Format Hardcover
  • Dimensions 6.25 x 9.25
  • Pages 544
  • Publication Date October 29, 2003

Endorsements

"This study is so masterful in its grasp of a vast array of evidence, so solid and innovative in its methodology, and so audacious in conception that it is bound to become a classic. It is the most important historical and sociological study ever written on Roman Christianity."
– Robert Jewett, Interpretation

"This impressive work puts our study of early Roman Christianity on a new and more certain empirical basis and must now serve as the point of departure for all subsequent research....Lampe has expanded our database and has provided the most extensive social profile of Roman Christianity currently available."
– John H. Elliot, Catholic Biblical Quarterly

"Lampe shows that there are both archaeological and literary grounds for saying that the early Roman Christian community was at first indistinguishable from the Jewish one, form which it emerged as perhaps a less affluent underclass of God-fearers. Lampe's book will impress all who read it as a well-informed attempt to synthesize a vast amount of data in a serious, informed, and scholarly way."
– Alan F. Segal, Journal of Biblical Literature

"Peter Lampe's extremely thorough study of the Roman Christians ... I would judge it the best work on an early Christian Church I have read in the last decade ... Lampe exhibits such balance and care that I would find myself hard-pressed to write the usual review, agreeing with some points and disagreeing with others. His conclusions are likely to be the basis of most on-going discussion ... The interest of these (Lampe's) theses for church history, as well as for New Testament, should be obvious."
– Raymond E. Brown, em. Professor of New Testament at Union Theological Seminary, NY, in: The Heythrop Journal, July 1988, 359-60

"This is a learned and enjoyable study of the social history of the Christian community in Rome ... It is not one of those social histories that wishes to substitute social factors for ideas and theologies, but a book which derives its strength from its perceptions of the intimate links between doctrine and life. Dr Lampe knows how to use epigraphic and juristic evidence ... He equally knows his way round the catacombs and the archaeological evidence ... And the freshness of his approach enables him to illuminate familiar texts from the Apostolic Fathers or the Apologists ... Among the most interesting parts of a very good book are the pages on Justin Martyr."
– Henry Chadwick, em. Professor of Divinity, Cambridge University, in: Journal of Theological Studies, April 1990, 228-9

"The author's interesting and informative work is a notable landmark ... The sociological approach to the evidence, successfully exploited by Wayne Meeks in his study of the Pauline churches, has found an able continuator in Lampe's thorough and scholarly examination of the first two centuries of Roman Christianity."
– W. H. C. Frend, em. Professor of Ecclesiastical History at the University of Glasgow, in: Journal of Ecclesiastical History 1990, 278-9

Table of Contents

    Foreword by Robert Jewett
    Editor's Note
    Introduction

    PART 1: INTRODUCTION: FROM THE BEGINNINGS OF URBAN ROMAN CHRISTIANITY TO THE SEPARATION FROM THE SYNAGOGUE

  1. The Entrance of Christianity via the Trade Route
  2. The "Edict of Claudius" and Separation from the Synagogue

    PART 2: TOPOGRAPHY

  3. In Which Quarters of the City Did the Christian Population Concentrate?
  4. Did Particular Strata of the Population Predominate in the Quarters under Investigation?

    PART 3: FIRST DIACHRONIC SECTION: GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT URBAN ROMAN CHRISTIANITY

  5. Jewish and Gentile Christians
  6. Information from Paul's Letter to the Romans and Acts 28:30f.
  7. Information in Conjunction with the Persecution by Nero
  8. Information from First Clement
  9. Information from Ignatius' Letter to the Romans
  10. The Shepherd of Hermas: Social Stratifications in the First Half of the Second Century and the Attendant Conflicts
  11. The Writings of Justin: The Social Structures of Christianity at the Middle of the Second Century
  12. The Excavation Complex at the Vatican
  13. Social Stratification at the Time of Commodus
  14. Traditio Apostolica
  15. Summary and Conclusion

    PART 4: SECOND DIACHRONIC SECTION: PROSOPOGRAPHIC INVESTIGATION

  16. The Roman Christians of Romans 16
  17. Claudius Ephebus and Valerius Biton (1 Clem. 63:3; 65:1)
  18. Aquila and Prisca
  19. Pomponia Graecina
  20. T. Flavius Clemens and Flavia Domitilla
  21. The Author of First Clement
  22. The Person of Hermas
  23. The Woman from Justin's Apology 2.2
  24. Marcion
  25. Justin
  26. Tatian and Rhoden
  27. Valentinians
  28. Carpocratians
  29. The Martyr Apollonius
  30. Marcus Aurelius Prosenes and Other Members of Caesar's Familia
  31. Two Wives of Governors: Women of Senatorial Rank
  32. Representatives of Western Latin Education
  33. The Theodotians
  34. Praxeas, Gaius, and the Problem of "Hippolytus"
  35. Summary

    PART 5: THE FRACTIONATION OF ROMAN CHRISTIANITY

  36. The Evidence of Fractionation
  37. Private Property Utilized by the Church Community
  38. The External Image of Christian House-Church Congregations
  39. Fractionation and Theological Pluralism
  40. Fractionation and Tolerance of People with Other Theological Opinions
  41. Practionation, Monarchical Episcopacy, and Presbyterial Governance

    PART 6: FINAL REMARKS

    Appendix 1
    Addendix 2
    Appendix 3
    Addpenix 4

    Abbreviations
    Bibliography
    Maps, Diagrams, and Figures
    Indexes
2